Translated Interview Details with Yu Yuen-wong, Creator of various Digimon Manhua

MarcFBR

Big Cheese
Staff
Admin
Show User Social Media
Hide User Social Media
Joined
Sep 8, 2006
Messages
12,992
Another surprise!

Image Thumbnail (custom)

If you were a Digimon fan back around when the original run of anime was on in the west, there was a decent chance you had, or at least saw, the various Digimon manga releases from Tokyopop.

As was often discussed, these weren't actually manga, but actually Chinese manhua by Yu Yuen-wong. These comic adaptions of the various anime were decently known back then. Adventure, 02, and Tamers got an American release (not to mention a number of other countries), while Frontier never did (although notably it did get an English release elsewhere that people would try and import.)

Prior to these he worked on a V-Pet based Digimon manhua known as 'Fight! Digital Monsters', and after the anime adaptions ended he worked on a manhua based on the Pendulum X V-Pets known as 'D-Cyber'.



Hket recently conducted an interview with him about his career in comics, and Digimon was discussed to a decent degree, since he's reasonably well known for it.

We don't have a full translation of the interview, but garm did translate all the relevant Digimon bits! (The bits jump back and forth a bit, and have been left in the order they were presented in.)



Image Thumbnail (custom)

When he finished drawing Digimon, Yu Yuen-wong didn't get any further work for half a year. While waiting for new work, he spent the time practicing.

He entered the industry when he was 18, and Digimon is still considered one of the primary representations of his work.

Initially when he began, there was no anime, just V-Pets. The initial rights when purchased was to make a manhua based on the V-Pets. The V-Pet related manhua isn't recognized much by people now compared to the other manhua.



Image Thumbnail (custom)

Several comic artists actually competed for the job to draw Digimon manhua. To audition they had to draw various types of characters. When he found out he was chosen he was so happy he didn't end up sleeping.

Most of the time he worked on Digimon he drew 20 pages every 2 weeks with only 1 assistant. Digimon was time-consuming, taking 4 to 5 hours per page, as he inked it traditionally. He doesn't have to be quite as careful with his lines nowadays with the transition to digital art.

He sees drawing Digimon as his glory days. Work in the industry is unstable, and you never know how soon, or even if, you will get a new job, not to mention if it'll be received well when you do. He chose this line of work and to this day doesn't feel like he gave up other opportunities to be in the industry. He believes it's all worth it when you think about how you do something you enjoy.



Image Thumbnail (custom)

After his work on Digimon, he went to work in animation for a year or two before returning to manhua.

Now that he's been in the industry for 20 years, he's never once thought about giving up, and there are constantly new things to learn. Although he does draw less manhua now than he did in the past, he muses on if perhaps parents don't seem to like their children reading to many comics, and that books tend to lean more towards novels with illustrations. He comments that when he does illustrations for novels, he sometimes adds in comic pages to change it up a little.

He believes the manhua industry has its highs and lows, but he hopes that fellow manhua artists will keep on changing just like how society is constantly changing.



It's been kind of fantastic lately all the bits of behind the scenes details we've gotten for parts of the franchise we don't always get to hear a lot about, and getting some info about the manhua was a bit unexpected, but really great!

Big thanks to garm for the translated details.
 

Muur

I'd rather roll
Show User Social Media
Hide User Social Media
Joined
Feb 21, 2017
Messages
3,209
Age
27
Location
Bolton, England
I'm glad someone who sounds passionate about the product was able to do it, and it seems like he did a good job!

Bandai, hire this man to make Cyber Sleuth and Hackers Memory Manhua.
 

TMS

Super Moderator
Staff
Show User Social Media
Hide User Social Media
Joined
Aug 11, 2009
Messages
11,656
Age
30
Location
Ohio
I don’t know how well his cartoony art style would work for something like Cyber Sleuth...

Also, it’s a shame that he had to put such long hours into manhua adaptations that feel so rushed plot-wise.
 

BlankShell

I'm going digital
Show User Social Media
Hide User Social Media
Joined
Apr 30, 2017
Messages
570
I had a few of the Tamers ones and I liked those, I thought it captured the whimsy the show hinted at but didn't commit to.
 

Vande

V-Tamer Vande
Staff
Admin
Show User Social Media
Hide User Social Media
Joined
Sep 9, 2006
Messages
16,907
Location
England - Sheffield
-pets her imported Frontier books-
The volume 3 of that is rather rare to get!

So much time into 1 page though! The manga did seemed rushed and had a few inconsistencies. But it was enjoyable all the same.
 

Shadow Shinji

I come from the net
Show User Social Media
Hide User Social Media
Joined
Mar 5, 2014
Messages
1,692
Location
Europe
I really like the mahuas from this guy, he's kinda a senpai to me. I would be very interested to ask him about the cancelled Frontier-sequel "Legends of the Sky", I know he was not involved in this project but he may know something else about the plot and behind the scenes notes. I would also like to know where he took inspiration to write D-Cyber, I like a lot this story and it's hands downs the rarest X-Antibody product indeed.
 
Last edited:

Unknown Neo

You got in
Show User Social Media
Hide User Social Media
Joined
Sep 10, 2006
Messages
11,454
Age
36
Location
Unknown
Cool. This guy is pretty talented. Haven't read any of these but I have heard of them.
 
Top