Hiro's last name

VamAngemon

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I have a genuine doubt about the composition of Hiro's surname. Is it normal for japanese last names to use kana particles? If so, why katakana instead of hiragana?
Is Amanokawa even a real last name or just Milky Way's proper name? Why 天ノ河 instead of 天の川? Is 河 commonly used in everyday Japanese as "river"? In surnames perhaps?

Please, can someone enlighten us in this matter?
 

TMS

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It's not really katakana. It's a kanji that represents "no" in old-fashioned Japanese names. Gaiomon Ittou no Kata also uses it.
 

VamAngemon

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Thanks for the answer!
 

Santaskid

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i don't know how often 河 is used instead of 川 It could be something relating specically to the milky way context... it could be something more old fashioned/routed in traditions like how Mount Fuji isn't read as Fujiyama but rather Fuji-san despite it clerly being written with the Yama(mountain) kanji. But it is a good quesion and yeah I think the confusion on the 'no' particle is the fact that people often seem to forget, or just aren't aware that Katakana and Hiragana get their origin from Kanji so it only makes sense that an old Kanji for no would be used in the modern scripts.
 

VamAngemon

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The fact that both uses the same unicode character doesn't help at all.
 
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