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Thread: Leadup Aftermath - More Anime and Manga (New Manga: Cardcaptor Sakura)

  1. #21
    Super Moderator TMS's Avatar
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    I'd appreciate it if you could link me to that blog, so that when I'm done I can see if they missed anything I caught, or vice versa.
    MY PROJECTS
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    Digimon Fan Fiction: The Call
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  2. #22
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    I'm back after having watched all the anime from the Nyarko franchise that I could get access to. Before I go into that, I've gone ahead and added links to my MyAnimeList profile in the first post of this thread, in case anyone's interested. Here it is as well: http://myanimelist.net/profile/TMS1

    Crawling! Nyarko-san and Crawling! Nyaruani: Remember My Love(craft-sensei)
    After realizing that Nyaruani: Remember My Love was a Flash series that assumed some basic familiarity with the franchise, I set it aside and watched the first season of the full anime adaptation. Then I went back and watched Remember My Love, then watched the rest of Nyarko-san (the second season and the three OVAs). I would have watched the original Nyaruani too, but wasn't able to find it. Anyway, I liked the show pretty well. It could be very amusing at times, though it's far from the funniest anime I've watched. It did seem to be one of the more perverted ones, though. Naturally, most of my interest was kept by the various references to the Cthulhu Mythos, inspired mostly by the Call of Cthulhu roleplaying game filtered through Japanese culture. Since I've now watched a year or two's worth of anime, I also got some of the many references to Japanese pop culture and anime in particular, though I'm sure the vast majority of it went over my head. It was fun to notice stuff like the Doki Dokki High School episode having a bunch of Haruhi references, or more subtle things like Nyarko's randomly exclaiming "Tenchi Muyo" in an episode that lifts its plot from an episode of Ryo-Oki. Of course, I paid special attention to the Digimon references in the form of the fictional franchise fittingly titled Dagomon. We see Dagomon Adventure in the first season and Dagomon World: ReDigitize in the second, and one of the previews for a Dagomon-related episode borrows the "now the adventure evolves" slogan from Digimon Adventure's episode previews.

    Well, I'm sure everyone saw this coming. Since that blog link didn't materialize, I went ahead and gave into my obsessions by noting all the Cthulhu Mythos elements referenced in the anime. Here's the guide, organized alphabetically by element. There may, of course, be things that I missed. Oftentimes the Mythos references were in the background, and in crowd scenes it could sometimes be hard to identify what, if any, Mythos creature a given character was supposed to be. If you notice I did miss anything, let me know. Naturally, I'd be happy to provide additional information about any of these entries.

    WARNING: Spoilers for the anime, various Cthulhu Mythos stories, and scenarios/campaigns from the Call of Cthulhu RPG may be included in this list, so read at your own risk.

    Alaozar: A prehuman city from August Derleth’s story “The Lair of the Star-Spawn.” Just as in the anime, it’s located in Burma/Myanmar, situated on the Isle of Stars in the Lake of Dread.
    Ankh: The Egyptian symbol is used as the symbol of the Starry Wisdom Church that worships Nyarlathotep in Lovecraft’s story “The Haunter of the Dark.” In the anime, Nyarko says the ankh doesn’t help with love.
    Aphoom-Zhah: A deity invented by Lin Carter in the form of a cold flame, resembling Cthugha. In the anime, Kune (herself a Cthugha) has a freezing attack called Aphoom-Zhah.
    Arkham: Fictional Massachusetts town from Lovecraft’s stories, known for haunted spots like the Keziah Mason “witch-house.” In the anime, one of the attractions at R’lyeh Land is the Arkham Haunted House.
    Arra Agga Bandar: Appears in the anime as a symbol on one of R’lyeh’s buildings. It’s a combination of three “sigils” from the “Simon Necronomicon,” an occult book published in the 1970s that claims to combine Lovecraft with Aleister Crowley and Sumerian mythology but fails on all three counts.
    Atlach-Nacha: The spider-god from Clark Ashton Smith’s story “The Seven Geases,” though some later authors consider it a goddess. Nyarko throws a drink called Atlach-Nacha to Hasuta so he can take his pills (the “cha” is kanji rather than katakana, but I can’t figure out what it is, so the pun is lost on me). The character Atoko is an Atlach-Nacha, hence the spider-web designs on her kimono. In the second season she sends Nyarko a box of “Atlach-Nachocolate.” In the cavern-like, cobweb-covered room that Mahiro and Nyarko find themselves in is probably a reference to the underground chasm that Atlach-Nacha spins his webs across in “The Seven Geases.” The gray creatures they fight there may or may not be a reference to the “Gray Weavers” that according to Lin Carter’s stories are the servants of Atlach-Nacha. Alternately, they might be the RPG’s Broodlings of Eihort, “humanoid” beings made up of the tiny, spider-like, parasitic children of the god Eihort from Ramsey Campbell’s story “Before the Storm.” This might fit with the OVA’s parasitic nanomachines, and the creatures' ability to pass as humans.
    Atlantis: Luhy makes an exclamation at one point that includes “Atlantis.” The mythological Atlantis was incorporated into the Cthulhu Mythos by Lovecraft and others. Various Mythos deities, such as Nyarlathotep, were worshipped there. In season 2 of the anime, there’s a bit called the “Atlantis Trans-Continental Ulthar Quiz.”
    Azathoth: The blind idiot god, Lord of All Things, who created the various universes in the Mythos. Kuko tells Mahiro that “Azathoth is always watching over us” while they’re inside the dating sim.
    Bast: The Egyptian goddess of cats, who the Call of Cthulhu RPG counts as one of the Elder Gods, the good deities that oppose the evil “Great Old Ones” (like Cthulhu, Cthugha, and Hastur) and “Outer Gods” (like Nyarlathotep). Not sure why the Bast in the anime is male, but he works with Nodens and N’tse-Kaambl, who are also Elder Gods in RPG parlance.
    Black Book: An epithet for Nameless Cults, a fictional book on the Mythos invented by Robert E. Howard, also known by its original German name, Unaussprechlichen Kulten. Nyarko mentions a Black Book that mentions a famous deity hunter that Mahiro may or may not be descended from.
    Byakhee: Servant creatures of Hastur invented by August Derleth that the RPG identified with unnamed creatures from Lovecraft’s story “The Festival.” Nyarko mentions them as an ingredient in a “BLT,” and several appear in crowd scenes. A Byakhee card also appears in the opening of the fictional Iron Striver television show.
    Call of Cthulhu: A pen-and-paper RPG inspired by Cthulhu Mythos stories. It’s referenced throughout the anime, with the characters occasionally seen playing it, and a shot from the third OVA’s ending that’s inspired by the cover of the game’s first edition rulebook. The game’s Sanity point (SAN) mechanic is referenced fairly often, sometimes in the form of puns like SANgo (coral) and SAN Oil (suntan oil). Also, when Nyarko, Kuko, and Hasuta are preparing to fight each other inside the dating sim, the game stats of the deities they’re based on are displayed (though in this case they’re inaccurate, since among other things the Size characteristic for all three is much larger than the human maximum).
    Carcosa: A terrible lost city, probably on another planet, associated with Hastur, hence the Carcosa Computer Entertainment company that Hasuta’s father works for.
    Call of Cthulhu: Referenced through R’lyeh Land’s beverage “Cola of Cthulhu.”
    Celaeno Library: The Great Library of Celaeno was invented by August Derleth, located on a planet circling the star Celaeno and run by the Great Race of Yith. Hastur’s byakhee servants take one of Derleth’s characters there in his stories, referenced in the anime by Hasuta having a part-time job there. The characters visit it in season 2.
    Chthonians: Large creatures like burrowing squids or tentacled worms, invented by post-Lovecraft author Brian Lumley. In the anime, several are among Lloigor’s minions.
    Clark Ashton Smith: A Cthulhu Mythos author and correspondent of H. P. Lovecraft. In the anime’s second season, a Cthugha by the name of Clark Ashton Smith appears (which is a little odd, considering the actual Smith had nothing to do with Cthugha).
    Color Out of Space: Possibly referenced through the color from another dimension mentioned in the fortune given by Kuko in the Flash series. There are other examples of indescribable colors in the Mythos, but Lovecraft’s “Colour Out of Space” is the best known.
    Cthugha: A deity of living flame invented by August Derleth. Derleth tried to assign the four classical elements to various Mythos deities, and Cthugha was basically invented because otherwise there wouldn’t have been any fire elementals in the pantheon. Kuko, of course, is based on Cthugha. In Derleth’s schema, the fire elementals like Cthugha are opposed to earth elementals like Nyarlathotep, and in one Derleth story Cthugha is actually summoned in order to banish Nyarlathotep, hence why in the anime the Nyarlathoteps and Cthughas are said to be enemies, and Nyarko is at a disadvantage fighting Kuko. A card depicting the literary Cthugha appears when the characters are playing Call of Cthulhu in the first episode of the second season.
    Cthulhu: No introduction needed here. The anime’s Cthulhu Corporation is named after Cthulhu, and a miniature Cthulhu is seen with Luhy in one of the eyecatches and is used as a symbol for Luhy’s takoyaki stand. In Derleth’s stories, Cthulhu is a water elemental, which explains why Luhy can manipulate water and ice. Cthulhu is one of the symbols on the 12-sided die seen in the second season’s episode title screens, and a Cthulhu is shown dressed as Indiana Jones when Nyarko threatens someone over the phone with ancient ruins. Finally, Cthulhu figurines appear as newel post toppers in the “Sevens’ Escape from the Curse” attraction, and a little Cthulhu (?) appears later on in the attraction.
    Cykranosh: The Hyperborean name for the planet Saturn, which serves as the setting of Clark Ashton Smith’s story “The Door to Saturn.” Nyarko mentions Cykranosh in the anime, where it’s apparently the name of a mecha in a video game she plays against Kuko.
    Dagon: A Philistine god typically depicted in the Mythos as a gigantic Deep One worshipped by his species, and one of Cthulhu’s chief servants. In the anime, Dagon belongs to the Cthulhu Corporation.
    Deep Ones: Amphibious humanoids that worship Cthulhu in Lovecraft’s stories. In the anime they appear as employees of the Cthulhu Corporation. A Deep One card appears in the Iron Striver opening.
    Dendo: The cake-maker D. Endo mentioned in the anime is probably a reference to “Deep Dendo,” a place referred to in Arthur Machen’s story “The White People” and the post-Lovecraft Mythos stories of Lin Carter.
    Derleth: The Derleth Family Restaurant, named after Mythos author August Derleth, appears as the place Mahiro works in the cursed dating sim.
    Dreamlands: In Lovecraft’s stories, Earth’s dreamland is a world made up of the collective unconscious of Earth’s inhabitants, which some people can reach by dreaming. In the anime, Nyarko is supposed to be watching over the Dreamlands, a reference to how in Lovecraft’s work Nyarlathotep manages the weak gods of Earth for the powerful Other Gods. The part of the Dreamlands that we see in the anime is Kadath, the mountain on which the gods of Earth have their onyx castle. Kadath is located in the Cold Waste, hence the “frozen wasteland” where the Banshin is battle tested. A Dreamland Club is also mentioned several times, perhaps inspired by Lovecraft’s unwritten novel The Club of the Seven Dreamers.
    Dunwich: At one point in the anime Kuko makes a joke about calling a certain kind of sandwich a dunwich, referencing a fictional Massachusetts town from Lovecraft’s work. The titular creature of Lovecraft’s story “The Dunwich Horror” is shown when Kuko makes the reference.
    Dylath-Leen: A large city of ill repute in Dreamland, which the protagonist of Lovecraft’s “Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath” visits. In season 2 of the anime, “Dylath-Lee…” can be seen as the start of a book title at the Great Library of Celaeno.
    Eibon: A sorcerer from ancient Hyperborea, invented by Clark Ashton Smith and acting as the protagonist of Smith’s story “The Door to Saturn.” In the Mythos he’s best known for writing the Book of Eibon. In the anime, Kuko points out a Ring of Eibon at a jewelry store that has Eibon’s seal on it (a symbol I believe originates in the RPG). [Incidentally, Eibon is a character in Soul Eater, and the Book of Eibon is mentioned in A Certain Magical Index, making Eibon a rather popular Mythos element for anime/manga series.]
    Elder Sign (1): A term used by Lovecraft in several contexts. In Derleth’s post-Lovecraft stories, it’s depicted as a five-pointed star containing a broken ellipse with a symbol like a pillar of fire at its center, the ellipse and pillar together resembling an eye. In Derleth’s stories and various later media, the Elder Sign is a protective symbol given by the good Elder Gods to seal away the evil Great Old Ones and their servants. The Elder Sign appears twice in the anime, once inside Nephren-Car and once as a pendant Nyarko finds at a souvenir shop. This is somewhat ironic, since in the Derleth Mythos Nyarlathotep was one of the evil gods that the Elder Sign was supposed to guard against. A more stylized Elder Sign appears on the “keeper’s screen” the characters use when playing Call of Cthulhu. Other Elder Signs are seen on the 12-sided die seen in the second season’s episode title screens, on the hat Nyarko wears during the “Atlantis Trans-Continental Ulthar Quiz,” in her monster hunting video game, and on one the large dice in the “Sevens’ Escape from the Curse” attraction.
    Elder Sign (2): Lovecraft drew the Elder Sign in one of his letters as a figure resembling a tree branch. Donald Tyson’s 2004 book Necronomicon: The Wanderings of Alhazred, an attempt to create a Necronomicon truer to Lovecraft’s fictional grimoire, introduced a more complex version of this Elder Sign, and it seems to be this that is seen on the front of the box holding Nyarko’s trapezohedron.
    Elder Things: An extraterrestrial species introduced in Lovecraft’s novella “At the Mountains of Madness,” Elder Things being the most common name used for them nowadays. In the anime they appear in crowd scenes and as minions of Lloigor, and one is used as a symbol for bedclothes in a department store (I’m not sure why; maybe it’s some sort of Japanese pun).
    Eye of Light and Darkness: The Eye of Horus seen on the 12-sided die in season 2’s episode title screens and on mahjong tiles used by the characters may be a reference to the Eye of Light and Darkness, a similar symbol (similar to the Elder Sign) from the RPG’s Masks of Nyarlathotep campaign.
    Ghatanothoa: A malign deity from Lovecraft’s story “Out of the Aeons.” In the anime, Gutatan is inspired by Ghatanothoa and belongs to the Ghatanothoa Conglomerate. Her ability to “petrify” Mahiro is based on the way the literary Ghatanothoa’s gaze petrifies whoever it falls on, condemning them to a living death. A miniature version of Ghatanothoa as he’s typically depicted appears with Gutatan in one of the eyecatches.
    Ghouls: In the Mythos, dog-like humanoids based on the corpse-eating creatures from Arabian myth. In the anime they appear as minor enemies of the protagonists. In the season 2 opening and when working for Nyarko’s brother they are paired with Nightgaunts, possibly a reference to the treaties the two species have in Lovecraft’s “Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath” (though their working for a Nyarlathotep makes less sense, since in the story they were among the forces opposing Nyarlathotep and his servants). A ghoul card appears in the Iron Striver opening.
    Gods of Earth: In Lovecraft’s stories, the human-like gods of Earth represent the gods revered by general humanity, though they have power only over Earth’s dreamland. They serve a similar role in the anime, though their weakness is exaggerated. Also in the anime, they are protected by the Banshin (lit. “foreign gods”), which is possibly a reference to how the powerful, monstrous Other Gods watch over them. The Banshin seen in the anime is based on Nyarlathotep, which is fitting given that in “The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath” Nyarlathotep is the messenger and brain of the Other Gods.
    Great Old Ones: A term used to refer to several prehuman, extraterrestrial species in Lovecraft’s stories, later used by August Derleth as the “evil deities” that oppose the benign Elder Gods. In the anime, Lloigor and Zhar say that they are one of the Great Old Ones after combining (some materials say that Derleth’s deities Lloigor and Zhar are connected to each other and part of the same being). Kuko later mentions a nutrient called “The Great Old One.”
    Great Race of Yith: A race of beings that debuted in Lovecraft’s “The Shadow Out of Time.” Originally from the dead planet Yith in the distant past, they have the ability to exchange minds with other beings anywhere in time or space, collecting information from all time periods and sometimes migrating as an entire species forward in time so as to escape extinction. When they first arrived on Earth they inhabited the bodies of a now extinct race of conical, plant-like beings. In the anime, the Great Race is basically the same, with their true forms being those of the conical beings (as seen projected on Mahiro’s window). Unlike in the literature, however, they come from the future instead of the past, and a faction of them wants to exchange minds with all of humanity, whereas in “The Shadow Out of Time” we learn that when they jumped ahead from the conical beings they skipped humanity entirely and inhabited the bodies of beetle-like creatures that arose after humanity’s extinction. Humanity’s extinction is also alluded to and averted in the anime.
    Gugs: A race of monstrous giants from Earth’s dreamland that appear in Lovecraft’s “Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath.” In the anime they appear in crowd scenes and as minions of Lloigor. In the first OVA, another Gug is shown being defeated in a magical girl anime.
    Last edited by TMS; 07-25-2016 at 07:14 PM.
    MY PROJECTS
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    Digimon Fan Fiction: The Call
    Card Games: Digimon Tactics and Shadow Stories [both in-progress]
    Questions or comments? Hit me up at #wtw on irc.rizon.net

  3. #23
    Super Moderator TMS's Avatar
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    Hastur: Originally mentioned in Ambrose Bierce’s story “Haita the Shepherd” as a god of shepherds, Hastur was later used in a more ambiguous context in Robert W. Chambers’ collection The King in Yellow (where it may be meant as a place name, and is also the name of a human character) and Lovecraft’s story “The Whisperer in Darkness.” Finally, August Derleth decided to make Hastur one of the malign deities of the Cthulhu Mythos. Hasuta from the anime is based on this last conception. He can manipulate wind because Derleth made Hastur the most powerful of the air elementals, and Hasuta’s father’s company and the Cthulhu Corporation are rivals because in Derleth’s schema air elementals oppose water elementals. Cthulhu and an avatar of Hastur even have a brawl in Derleth’s story “The Return of Hastur,” until the Elder Gods come to put them back in time-out. In one of the eyecatches Hasuta holds a miniature Hastur that combines the King in Yellow (nowadays considered Hastur’s main avatar) with the features of Derleth’s octopoid Hastur. A card with a similar depiction of Hastur on it appears when the characters are playing Call of Cthulhu in the first episode of the second season. Later in the season, Hasuta’s true form, based on the King in Yellow, is revealed. Hasuta refers to himself as the King, and is dressed in tattered yellow clothing, as the King in Yellow is described. He also wears a white mask, probably a reference to the Pallid Mask sometimes mentioned in conjunction with the King in Yellow. The Pallid Mask reappears, along with a portrait of the King in Yellow, inside the third OVA’s “The Seven’s Escape from the Curse” attraction.
    “The Haunting”: An introductory scenario from the Call of Cthulhu RPG, formerly called “The Haunted House.” A cult symbol from the scenario (an eye at the center of three Ys forming a triangle) appears in the background of the anime when Nyarko is explaining the business of investigating haunted houses to Mahiro.
    “He waits, dreaming”: A phrase sometimes used to describe Cthulhu in the Mythos. Nyarko references it when the stars align and R’lyeh Land rises, an event that itself references the prophesied rise of Cthulhu’s city, R’lyeh, when “the stars are right.” It’s later used as the title of an episode, where it presumably refers to Mahiro rather than Cthulhu.
    HPL: Lovecraft’s initials, often used as shorthand to refer to him. The anime’s HPL System used to build the Banshin is a reference to that.
    Hunting Horror: Servants of Nyarlathotep mentioned but not described in Lovecraft’s “The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath.” The RPG identified them with flying, serpentine creatures from Derleth’s novel The Lurker at the Threshold, and this is how they’re depicted in the anime, where they’re summoned by Lloigor instead of by a Nyarlathotep.
    Hydra: Lovecraft’s “The Shadow Over Innsmouth” mentions “Mother Hydra” as a consort of Dagon. Like Dagon, Hydra was portrayed by later authors as a giant Deep One. In the anime, she’s Dagon’s girlfriend.
    “Ia! Ia!”: An exclamation (presumably of praise) that’s often included in the verbal rituals of Mythos deities’ worshippers. In the anime, we hear a squeaky “Ia! Ia!” several times when Mahiro focuses on Luhy’s mini-Cthulhu mascot. It’s also on the sticker/logo on Nyarko’s phone.
    Innsmouth: A fictional Massachusetts seaport controlled by the Deep Ones and a cult that worships Dagon/Cthulhu. In the anime, Innsmouth-kun is R’lyeh Land’s mascot, and is based on the human-Deep One hybrids that make up most of Innsmouth’s population.
    Insects from Shaggai: A race of sapient extraterrestrial insects from a Ramsey Campbell story inspired by an entry in Lovecraft’s “commonplace book.” Nyarko buys some as ingredients for a barbecue, but they later thaw out and make a mess of Mahiro’s kitchen.
    Lake Hali: The Lake of Hali is a sinister place invented by Robert W. Chambers and located near Carcosa. It takes its name from a sage mentioned in a couple of Ambrose Bierce’s horror stories. Hasuta mentions Lake Hali when making a pinkie swear with Mahiro (whoever breaks the promise must drink 1,000 cups of water from the lake).
    Lamp of Alhazred: An artifact from the August Derleth story named after it. When lit, the ancient lamp shows visions of various places. In the anime, Nyarko says it doesn’t help with love.
    Leng Plateau: The plateau of Leng is an evil place mentioned in Lovecraft’s stories, variously located in central Asia, Antarctica, and the northern reaches of Earth’s dreamland. One of the attractions Nyarko points out at R’lyeh Land is the Leng Plateau Go-Karts.
    Lloigor: Can refer either to a deity from Derleth’s story “The Lair of the Star-Spawn” or a race of extraterrestrial beings from Colin Wilson’s novella “The Return of the Lloigor.” In the anime, Lloigor is first mentioned by Nyarko as an ingredient for a “BLT.” The character Roy Fogger introduces himself as a Lloigor and the butler of Gutatan, a reference to the Wilson Lloigors’ association with the god Ghatanothoa. His appearance is also based on the Lloigor, which are normally insubstantial but can on dragon-like physical forms. Roy Fogger’s larger, tentacled form (only referred to as Lloigor) is based on the Derleth deity.
    Lloigor & Zhar: Together, Lloigor and Zhar (again, from Derleth’s “Lair of the Star-Spawn”) are a pair of gods referred to as the Twin Obscenities living beneath the prehuman city of Alaozar. The Lloigor and Zhar that appear in the anime’s second season and are fought at Alaozar are a reference to this.
    Lobon: One of the gods of Earth, mentioned in Lovecraft’s story “The Doom That Came to Sarnath.” In the Flash series, Kuko gets a part-time job at a convenience store called Lloigor Station. The store’s logo is a spearhead, a reference to how the RPG describes Lobon as carrying a magical spear.
    Lovecraft, H. P.: Mentioned several times in the course of the anime, apparently having written his stories under the guidance of aliens. He appears on Nyarko’s apron in the Flash series, and appears as the minister overseeing a wedding in one of Mahiro’s dreams (which is somewhat ironic given his atheism).
    Mansions of Madness: A board game based on the Call of Cthulhu RPG. The exterior shot of the “Apartment of Madness” haunted house attraction in season 2 of the anime mimics the board game’s box art.
    Medusa’s Coil: The maids that serve Gutatan and Lloigor who can shape their hair into hands could be a reference to Lovecraft’s story “Medusa’s Coil,” in which a woman (who may be a distant descendant of Cthulhu’s spawn) has living hair with a mind of its own.
    Mi-Go: “Mi-go” is the most commonly used name for a species of extraterrestrial beings resembling fungi and crustaceans, playing their largest role in Lovecraft’s “Whisperer in Darkness.” In the anime, they appear in crowd scenes and as minions of Lloigor, and are featured in a season 2 episode (earlier in the season Mahiro sees a book in the Celaeno Library titled Mi-go from Space). Their plan to mine Earth’s minerals, their desire to place Mahiro’s brain in special canisters, and the fact that they originally came to earth in prehuman times are all derived from Lovecraft’s description of them. The anime says they come from Yuggoth (Pluto), which was their nearest colonized planet in Lovecraft’s fiction. Ironically, a song called “The Messenger from Yuggoth” is their downfall in the anime. Their use of flying saucers to get around might reflect the RPG’s assertion that they are connected to the “Grey” aliens associated with UFOs (in the literature they fly through space using their own wings). Their giant leader may be based on N’gah-Kthun, who Lin Carter said was the chief of the Mi-go (taking the name from an unexplained phrase in “The Whisperer in Darkness”). A (toy?) Mi-go appears on the cover of the fictional eroge It’s Hard to Be an Evil God in Love. In the third OVA, Kuko mentions a video site called Mi-go Mi-go Douga, a parody of the real video site Nico Nico Douga.
    The Mirror of Nitocris: Nitocris (or Nitokris) is a mythological and somewhat sinister Egyptian queen who is referenced in several Mythos stories such as Lovecraft’s “Under the Pyramids.” The Mirror of Nitocris is an artifact invented by post-Lovecraft author Brian Lumley, and appears in the anime as a hand mirror. As in Lumley’s fiction, the mirror can suck victims into it.
    Moon-Beasts: Lunar creatures resembling huge toads whose faceless snouts end in tentacles. In “The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath” they are worshipers and servants of Nyarlathotep, while in the anime they appear in crowd scenes and sometimes as minor enemies. At least, I think they do. The moon-beasts in the anime are brownish in color, whereas Lovecraft described them as grayish white with pink tentacles.
    Mountains of Madness: How the narrator of Lovecraft’s “At the Mountains of Madness” sometimes refers to a range of mountains higher than the Himalayas that his expedition team discovers in Antarctica, beyond which is the dead city of the Elder Things and Shoggoths. When Mahiro and Nyarko first go to R’lyeh Land in the anime, Nyarko points out Madness Mountain, the universe’s third biggest roller coaster.
    Necronomicon: A fictional grimoire invented by Lovecraft that contains all sorts of disturbing information about the Cthulhu Mythos. In the Great Library of Celaeno Mahiro sees a book titled Necrono-mikon Picture Diary.
    Nephren-Ka: A fictional Egyptian pharaoh invented by Lovecraft. Lovecraft’s story “The Haunter of the Dark” revealed him to have been a worshiper of Nyarlathotep, and the RPG campaign Masks of Nyarlathotep suggests that the Nephren-Ka might actually have been Nyarlathotep in human form. Nyarko’s all-purpose vehicle in the anime is called the Nephren-Car.
    Nightgaunts: Creatures from Lovecraft’s childhood nightmares that later appeared in his stories (parsed as night-gaunts). In the anime they frequently appear as minor enemies, often working for Nodens, who is their master according to “The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath.” Additionally, a miniature Nightgaunt appears in the drink Nyarko is serving in the first season’s ending sequence, a Nightgaunt card appears in the Iron Striver opening, Mahiro and Shantak-kun play a game of whack-a-mole where the “moles” look like Nightgaunts, and a large group of Nightgaunts is seen working under Nodens to complete the Banshin. Unlike Lovecraft’s creatures, the anime’s Nightgaunts are not silent, and can form mouths in the center of their blank faces.
    Nodens: A Celtic deity that is mentioned in Lovecraft’s stories as the Lord of the Great Abyss (being mentioned with that title in Arthur Machen’s novella “The Great God Pan”). Nodens is less dangerous to humans than most Mythos deities, and is one of the benign Elder Gods in Derleth’s stories and the RPG. Nodens appears at several points in the anime, originally as an antagonist, a reference to his status as an Elder God and the fact that he opposed Nyarlathotep in “The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath.” His bearing a trident seems to refer to his association with Neptune in Lovecraft’s “The Strange High House in the Mist.” The chessboard-like region where he sends Nyarko to battle Kuko is probably taken from the RPG. The RPG describes Nodens as never fighting directly, dealing with opponents with his Nightgaunt servants or banishing them from his presence, which is true of Nodens in the anime as well.
    N’tse-Kaambl: One of the Elder Gods, invented by post-Lovecraft author Gary Myers in his Dreamland stories. She’s a powerful warrior goddess who invented the Derleth-style Elder Sign. In the anime she appears alongside fellow Elder Gods Nodens and Bast.
    The Outsider and Others: The first collection of Lovecraft’s short stories, published after his death. In the third OVA’s opening, Hasuta holds up a book titled The Crawling Chaos Nyarlathotep whose cover mimics (in a much more colorful way) The Outsider and Others’ original cover.
    Nyarlathotep: A prominent Cthulhu Mythos deity who debuted in the eponymous Lovecraft story. He is often referred to as the Crawling Chaos, and is said to have a thousand different forms. He sometimes takes human form to help humans sow the seeds of their own destruction. In the anime, Nyarko is, of course, a Nyarlathotep, and various references are made to the Crawling Chaos and changing forms. Several shots where Mahiro pictures her in her more monstrous forms resemble the Dweller in Darkness, the form Nyarlathotep takes in Derleth’s story of the same name. Mahiro’s reference to a “nauseating mist” as one possible form is probably a nod to the Crawling Mist, a form of the god from Brian Lumley’s novel Elysia. The appearance of Nyarko’s brother is inspired by Nyarlathotep’s human form as described in “The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath,” and at one point he transforms into the Bloody Tongue, a Nyarlathotep Avatar from the RPG’s Masks of Nyarlathotep. In the first episode of the second season, several other references are made to Mythos lore. Nyarko is referred to as a faceless deity (one of Nyarlathotep’s titles/avatars being the Faceless God). The idea of Nyarlathotep being involved with nuclear weapons comes from Robert Bloch’s story “The Shadow from the Steeple,” the plot of which involves the Shining Trapezohedron, which is shown on the screen at that moment in the anime.
    When Mahiro and Hasuta do a search on Nyarko at the Celaeno Library, a list of various Nyarlathotep avatars pops up. Many of them are from the RPG: Queen in Red, Black Bull, Aku-Shin Kage (Shadow of Malice, the form Nyarlathotep should take in Japan), Jack O’Lantern, Black Pharaoh, Black Demon, Set (taken from Egyptian mythology), Wicker Man, Small Crawler, Bloody Tongue, Thoth (also from Egyptian mythology), Pool of Shadow, Horned Man, Kruschtya Equation, and Tezcatlipoca (taken from Aztec mythology). Other forms in the list are from literature: the Host and Floating Horror from A. A. Attanasio’s “The Star Pools,” Kokopelli (a Native American mythological figure) from the Donald R. Burleson story of the same name, Ahtu from David Drake’s “Than Curse the Darkness,” Shugoran from T.E.D. Klein’s “Black Man with a Horn,” the Black Man from Lovecraft’s “The Dreams in the Witch House,” the Black Lion from Stanley C. Sargent’s “Nyarlatophis,” the Tick Tock Man from Attanasio’s “I Dream of Wires,” and the Messenger of the Old Ones from Joseph Payne Brennan’s “The Willow Platform.” The High Priest Not to Be Described, mentioned in Lovecraft’s Dreamland stories, is also in the list, though in his works it was a worshipper of Nyarlathotep rather than Nyarlathotep himself.
    Pallid Dancers: I could be mistaken about this, but these servants of Hastur from the RPG might appear as minions of Lloigor in the anime.
    Pazuzu: A demon from Assyrian mythology. He’s a form of Nyarlathotep according to the RPG, and is mentioned in the Simon Necronomicon (which erroneously attributes him to Sumerian myth). Nyarko shouts “Pazuzu!” at one point in response to being stabbed with a fork.
    Rats in the Walls: “The Rats in the Walls” is one of Lovecraft’s stories. Nyarko mutters about “the rats in the walls” when her Sanity points drop after Mahiro says he dislikes her, referencing the eventual insanity of the Lovecraft story’s narrator (who mentions Nyarlathotep at one point).
    R’lyeh: The prehuman, alien city built by Cthulhu and his spawn, which sank beneath the Pacific Ocean long ago, though it rises during the events of “The Call of Cthulhu.” In the anime, “R’lyeh Land” is instead a huge amusement park owned by the Cthulhu Corporation, though it’s located at the same coordinates as Cthulhu’s tomb. Its architecture is much less alien than in Lovecraft’s stories, but the impossible geometry of Lovecraft’s R’lyeh is alluded to in the anime when Nyarko says that the space inside one of R’lyeh Land’s buildings is warped so that it’s larger inside than outside. Mahiro also sees a book in the Celaeno Library titled Everything Other Than R’lyeh Sinks.
    Last edited by TMS; 07-25-2016 at 07:13 PM.
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  4. #24
    Super Moderator TMS's Avatar
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    Sarkomand: An ancient, abandoned city in Dreamland. Mahiro sees a book in the Celaeno Library titled Sarkomand of Hell.
    Seal of Nyarlathotep: A seal representing Nyarlathotep, according to Tyson’s Necronomicon. Nyarko draws it in the air before her first fight with a Nightgaunt, and it appears atop the box containing her trapezohedron and on the Joker cards that she creates while playing against Kuko.
    Servitor Race: The RPG divides races of beings into independent races and servitor races. Shantaks are considered a servitor race, hence why Nyarko at one point refers to Shantak-kun as “the gem of the servitor races.”
    Serpent People: Invented by Robert E. Howard in his story “The Shadow Kingdom,” the serpent men were later referenced by Lovecraft and other writers. In the anime they appear in crowd scenes and as minor enemies.
    Servitors of the Outer Gods: Strange, flute-playing beings that were first described by August Derleth, though they have their roots in Lovecraft stories like “The Festival” and “The Rats in the Walls.” In the anime they appear in crowd scenes and as minor enemies.
    Shantak: Shantaks (also called Shantak-birds) are a species of wyvern-like creatures that live in Dreamland and often serve as mounts for Nyarlathotep’s servants. In reference to this, Nyarko has a pet Shantak in the anime, creatively called Shantak-kun that the characters sometimes use as a ride or fighting force. Nyarko says that Shantak-kun has always lost battles against Nightgaunts, a reference to how Shantaks are deathly afraid of Nightgaunts in “The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath,” the story they first appeared in.
    Shining Trapezohedron: A jewel from Yuggoth that appears in Lovecraft’s story “The Haunter of the Dark” and can be used to see visions of space and to summon Nyarlathotep’s Haunter of the Dark avatar. Though unnamed in the anime, the jewel or good luck charm that Nyarko gives to Mahiro is based on the Shining Trapezohedron. Both are kept in boxes with strange symbols on them, and both can be used as manifestation points for Nyarlathotep. Also, I have in my notes that at one point the anime uses the phrase “Unbreakable Trapezohedron,” but I can’t remember what the context was.
    Shoggoths: Protoplasmic blobs that had their first major appearance in Lovecraft’s “At the Mountains of Madness,” where they were created to be the slaves of the Elder Things but grew in intelligence and rebelled against their masters. In the anime they appear first as minions of Lloigor and later in crowd scenes. When first seen they constantly repeat “Tekeli-li,” a word that in the story was picked up from their masters. Lovecraft borrowed it from Edgar Allan Poe’s novel The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym. A Shoggoth card appears in the Iron Striver opening.
    Shub-Niggurath: A Mythos fertility deity from Lovecraft’s stories. In the anime, Nyarko buys Shub-Niggurath brand meat, and refers to Shub-Niggurath by her most common epithet, the Black Goat of the Woods with a Thousand Young. One of the “thousand young” appears in silhouette on the package, and several Dark Young appear later as minions of Lloigor. Shub-Niggurath’s young were not described in Lovecraft’s stories, though the Twin Blasphemies, Nug (Cthulhu’s progenitor) and Yeb are her children according to Lovecraft, as is the serpent god Yig. Derleth seems to suggest that Hastur is also her spawn. The tree-like Dark Young that appear in the anime are taken from the RPG, which based them on the way Shoggoths are portrayed in Robert Bloch’s story “Notebook Found in a Deserted House.” In season 2, Nyarko mentions Shub-Niggurath Gynecology, and a Dark Young card appears in the Iron Striver opening.
    Silver Key: An artifact that first appeared in the Lovecraft story named after it. It allows its user (if they know the proper techniques and formulas) to enter other worlds and travel through time and space. In the anime the characters use it by putting it under their pillows while they sleep, allowing them to reach the Dreamlands.
    Star Vampires: The RPG’s name for the race of creatures from Robert Bloch’s story “The Shambler from the Stars.” In the anime, the Iron Striver television show references “Star Vampire Crusaders,” but it’s unclear what’s being referred to.
    Stygia: A sinister country resembling ancient Egypt that existed in Robert E. Howard’s Hyborian Age, the time in which the Conan stories (which are part of the Mythos) are set. In the anime, Nyarko finds an old video game made by the company Stygia Soft.
    Tcho-Tcho: A race of short, bald humanoids originally from Derleth’s “Lair of the Star-Spawn.” Since in that story they dwell in the ancient city of Alaozar, it’s fitting that Alaozar is where Nyarko and the others fight some Tcho-Tchos in the anime.
    Tezcatlipoca: Shouted by Nyarko’s brother when he’s injured in the anime. As noted above, the Aztec god Tezcatlipoca is an avatar of Nyarlathotep according to the RPG.
    Tindalos: First mentioned in Frank Belknap Long’s story “The Hounds of Tindalos.” In the anime, Nyarko offers one of the hounds in hotdog form to Mahiro. In the second season, the NGO that Zhar and Lloigor are members of is called Space Tindalos. Also, at one point Mahiro asks Hasuta why there is putty in the corners of his room, and Hasuta responds that there are some things Mahiro’s better off not knowing. This is presumably an indirect reference to the Hounds of Tindalos, which can manifest through angles, leading one of the characters in Long’s story to try and eliminate the corners of his room with plaster in order to escape them.
    Ulthar: The cats of Ulthar (a village in Dreamland) are mentioned by Kuko as scratching those who interfere with the love lives of others. This could be a reference to how in the story “The Cats of Ulthar” the cats take revenge on those responsible for killing a boy’s beloved kitten. In season 2, Nyarko participates (?) in the “Atlantis Trans-Continental Ulthar Quiz.”
    Tsathoggua: A furry, toad-like deity of the Cthulhu Mythos invented by Clark Ashton Smith. Nyarko lists Tsathoggua as one of the ingredients in a “BLT.”
    Ut’ulls-Hr’ehr: A monstrous Mythos goddess mentioned in Joseph Pulver’s post-Lovecraft Mythos novel Nightmare’s Disciple. In the anime, the second-season character Tsuruko is an Ut’ulls-Hr’her. Her love of yaoi may be a reference to the goddess’s primary cult being formed entirely of females (a demographic with which yaoi seems to be popular). Worship of the goddess revolves around sex and torture, which makes doujinshi author a very fitting job for Tsuruko.
    “The window! The window!”: A line from Lovecraft’s story “Dagon.” Nyarko mutters it when her Sanity points are dangerously low.
    Xoth: According to Lin Carter (and repeated by Kuko), the star from which Cthulhu and his family originates. In the anime it gives its name to the Cthulhu Corporation’s X-oth game system.
    Yellow Sign: A sinister alien symbol associated with the cult of Hastur that is mentioned repeatedly in Robert W. Chambers’ King in Yellow stories. Its appearance was first drawn for use in the RPG. It appears in many places throughout the anime, such as on the paper Hasuta is looking at in the first season opening, the road sign Hasuta sees while looking for Mahiro’s mom, in Hasuta’s eyecatches, on the bottle of drugs for motion sickness that Nyarko gives him (which says YS on the label), on the pendant worn by Hasuta’s true form, on the bottle of SAN Oil, on Agent Smith’s mahjong tiles, etc.
    “You fool…”: At one point in the show Nyarko answers her boss’s phone call with the line, “You fool, Kuko is dead,” a reference to a line from Lovecraft’s story “The Statement of Randolph Carter.”
    Yste: At one point in the anime Yoichi is seen reading a magazine titled Music of Yste, a reference to The Song of Yste, an ancient book invented by Robert A. Lowndes for his story “The Abyss.”

    And finally done. Next I'll be watching Persona 4: The Golden Animation. Megami Tensei fans didn't really have anything good to say about it when I asked about it in another topic, but I went back and watched the Hellsing TV adaptation after seeing the OVA, and I figure I can do this too.
    Last edited by TMS; 08-06-2016 at 08:39 PM.
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    Super Moderator TMS's Avatar
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    Aw, no one responded to my wall(s) of text. Anyway, I've watched two anime series since last posting.

    Persona 4: The Golden Animation
    As I said in my last post, I didn't exactly have this second take on a Persona 4 anime commended to me, but I liked the original adaptation and thought I'd give this one a shot too. And, to be honest, I wasn't disappointed. Yeah, most of it was the sort of slice of life stuff that made up a surprising percentage of the first anime, but I didn't really mind, since I'd already seen the main plot of the game depicted, and was fine with the focus on developing Marie's character. What elements of the story The Golden Animation did return to were interesting to watch and note the differences, and I appreciated getting to see more of Adachi's background. It was kind of funny to see how Ame no Sagiri, the "final boss" of the game and first anime, was handled. Basically, it shows up, Yu goes "WTF?", then shrugs and murders it with one slash. The Megami Tensei wiki suggests, from the advanced techniques used by Izanagi in the first battle, that this anime is based on a "New Game+" run-through, which could explain why Ame no Sagiri was so easily dispatched (apart from plot convenience, I mean). The climactic episodes were good, and as well worth watching as anything from the first series. After finishing the series proper, I also watched the alternate ending special, which was kind of a downer way to finish off Persona 4 anime, lol. But oh well. We know what really happened.

    By the way, though I am finished with Persona 4's anime adaptations, I plan to read its light novel sequel, Persona x Detective Naoto, which I've selected as my first foray into light novels, a medium I've been wanting to study and perhaps adapt somehow to my own purposes. But I've decided not to read it until I've finished reading Excel Saga (tonight I downloaded the 23rd of its 27 volumes).

    The Disappearance of Nagato Yuki-chan
    Speaking of alternate takes on shows I've seen before... My reaction to the show has been posted in the leadup thread dedicated to it: http://withthewill.net/threads/15103

    Next I'm going to watch Mushihi. I hadn't realized until now what a large franchise it was, and am not sure yet if I'll watch all three seasons, the two specials, and the movie all at once or whether I'll take a break somewhere in the middle to watch something else. Assuming I like the first season well enough to continue watching, I mean, but right now I expect it to be interesting. Anyone else been watching/reading anything?
    Last edited by TMS; 08-06-2016 at 09:24 PM.
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  6. #26
    Completely digital Xadhoom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TMS View Post
    Anyone else been watching/reading anything?
    Ghost Stories; basically, an officially licensed abridged series before the concept was invented.

  7. #27
    Super Moderator TMS's Avatar
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    (Oops, forgot to change the thread's title. It's been updated now.)

    Is Ghost Stories an adaptation of something?
    MY PROJECTS
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  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by TMS View Post
    (Oops, forgot to change the thread's title. It's been updated now.)

    Is Ghost Stories an adaptation of something?
    Not as far as I know, but then, I know nothing about its production history.

  9. #29
    Super Moderator TMS's Avatar
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    Looking at its Wikipedia page, it's a show with an English gag dub, basically? I wasn't sure what you meant, but that makes sense. Maybe if I get bored or run out of other anime I'll watch one or both versions of it. I mean, it's got ghosts in it, and that's always fine by me.
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  10. #30
    Completely digital Xadhoom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TMS View Post
    Looking at its Wikipedia page, it's a show with an English gag dub, basically? I wasn't sure what you meant, but that makes sense. Maybe if I get bored or run out of other anime I'll watch one or both versions of it. I mean, it's got ghosts in it, and that's always fine by me.
    From what I gather and what I've seen, the english dub is really the only version of the anime worth watching.

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